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Story Title   "Reestablishing Hops in the North Country"
Program   Franklin - Ag & Natural Resources - Horticulture
Educators   Rick LeVitre
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   Yes
Executive Summary  

The “Reestablishing Hops in the North Country” Project engaged hop growers, brewers, maltsters, scientists, cooperative extension personnel, state agency officials, business planning consultants and other stakeholders in three workshops this past program year. The purpose in providing these educational opportunities is to improve capacity and confidence to produce hops, unveil economic opportunities for partnering farm businesses, and increase supplies of New York State-grown brewing ingredients.

 

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

New York State was predominant supplier of hops from 1840 to 1920. Franklin County had the 3rd largest production In NYS. Northern New York is well-suited for and well-known for hops cultivation, large yield and high quality. Today, there are few hops grown In Clinton, Essex, Franklin and St.

Lawrence Counties {estimates are, anecdotally, 10-15).

In 2012, NYS created a farm brewery license requiring purchase of 20% of hops from NYS producers escalating to 90% requirement by 2024. NYS grown hops supplies are insubstantial to supply demand.

An angel investment group is interested in hops production. Business and community leaders are excited as they view agriculture start-ups as economic development; working landscapes augmenting tourism and potential for brew pubs and improved downtown business growth.

 

Extension Responses  

Expanded data base of hops growers, those with intent and brewers living in and around Franklin County.

Set up an exhibit at Franklin County Fair, Adirondacks Lake Region Business Expo, Malone Area Chamber of Commerce Business Expo and Rotary explaining the project, asking for contact info of those interested.

Applied to various organizations and local businesses for funding to support research and education.

Held a kick-off dinner to determine interest for "Reestablishing Hops in the North Country" which was attended by 26 Individuals from Franklin and Clinton Counties - 10 growers, 4 brewers, 9 ready to start, 2 community leaders, and 1 investor.

Conducted a “Growing Hops 101” day-long program in May with NYS CCE Hops Specialist Steve Miller and Harvest New York Regional Specialis.

In August, Colorado State Specialist Ron Godin presented "Hops - Summer Tips, Pest Issues, Producer Panel & More!" at Paul Smith's College (PSC). Attendees included hops growers, barley growers, malters, economic development leaders. PSC and Sodexo Services put on a beer pairing dinner as well. Next two days were devoted to site visists by Dr. Godin to local hop yards in Franklin and Essex County.

 

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Growers were ecstatic over local interest and support of growing a crop of historical importance to the area. Also felt far removed from expert help and were excited to participate in local educational events. Many learned new horticultural practices related to hop production. Some, however, learned that growing hops was either too intensive or too expensive to pursue further. This in itself was a valuable lesson.

Several businesses are in conversation with investors to open breweries in the area and to support increased growth of hops production.

 

Collaborators  

Angel investors of Point Positive, State Hops Specialists in NYS, CO, VT. The Coudsplitter Foundation, local hops growers, PSC, The VIC, Local Businesses, Chamber of Commerce, Franklin County Economic Development Office.

Special funding sources (if any)  

Cloudsplitter Foundation - $28,000

Local Businesses - +/-$1000

Angel Investor - $1000


Story Title   Agroforestry: Cultivating Shiitake Mushrooms; Growing ‘Wild Simulated’ American Ginseng
Program   Franklin - Ag & Natural Resources - Horticulture
Educators   Richard L. Gast
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

    Practicing proper woodlot and/or forest stewardship enables landowners to achieve important goals and benefits without compromising the ability of their land to meet the needs of the future.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Cornell University Associate Professor of Horticulture Ken Mudge once described agro-forestry as “a multidisciplinary approach to agricultural production that achieves diverse, profitable, sustainable land use by integrating trees with non-timber forest crops.”

    Production of either woods-cultivated or wild simulated ginseng can be pursued either as a hobby or as a means of producing significant income over time. Woods cultivated ginseng is grown in a forested environment in tilled beds under natural shade, while wild simulated ginseng is grown in forests in untilled soil. Growing ginseng using either of these methods usually requires little or no work after planting and there are markets for both.

    The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation estimates that that ginseng cultivation and harvesting on private woodlands in New York State generates over $3 million annually, and that the value of out-of-state harvested ginseng bought and sold by New York dealers each year exceeds $50 million.

 

    Since 2006 Ken Mudge and coworkers at Cornell University have been conducting research on shiitake and other specialty forest mushrooms at the Arnot Forest near Ithaca, N.Y. This research has focused on four broad areas including substrate tree species, seasonal consideration, laying yard management, and cultivation of lion’s mane mushrooms.

    Shiitake mushrooms have been grown in the U.S. only since the early 1980s so the process of cultivating shiitake mushrooms is still in its relative infancy.

    Forest cultivation of shiitake mushrooms can generate income, diversify farm and forestry enterprises, add value to forestry by-products and create opportunities for timber stand improvement.

    Releasing crop trees by thinning or removing low-grade and / or excess small diameter trees (culls) from timber stands has long been considered an important management practice for achieving healthy and sustainable forests and other ecosystem management objectives. But conventional hardwood markets have offered little or no economic incentive for the removal of low-quality hardwood trees. In fact, low-grade and small diameter trees are commonly left behind after a timber harvest, a practice known as high grading, which results in unproductive land, where a future return from saw timber can take a minimum of 50 – 75 years or more to realize.

    On the other hand, a landowner who chooses to properly manage a timber stand by removing culls and releasing crop trees can use the removed material for shiitake mushroom production and generate ongoing profit from the sale of sustainably cultivated mushrooms. The result is short-term payback for long-term management of woodlots and private forest land.

    According to 2010 – 2011 USDA National Ag Statistics Service information, US demand for Shiitake mushrooms is on the rise. 6,702,000 pounds of shiitake mushrooms were grown in the United States last year. The farm gate value of the crop was $19,223,000.

Extension Responses  

The Akwesasne Mohawk Tribe expressed interest in providing members of their community with opportunities to learn about Shiitake mushroom cultivation and growing (wild simulated) American ginseng. Franklin County Extension contacted retired Greene County Agriculture and Natural Resources Program Leader and NY State specialist for American Ginseng Production for Cornell University Cooperative Extension, Bob Beyfuss, who agreed to provide both workshops in the course of a one-day curriculum. Working with two of his colleagues, Bob lead the presentation on growing ginseng, including hands-on inoculation, and his two colleagues, Anna Plattner and Justin Vergottini-Wexler lead the program on cultivating shiitake mushrooms, including on-site visual Site assessments for ginseng cultivation, and the oyster mushroom cultivation program. The workshop took place on May 26.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Oyster mushroom inoculation on corn husks proved very successful with the harvest being distributed among most of the participants. TP inoculation was not as successful. The results of the shiitake hardwood bolt inoculation is yet to be seen, but things appear to be very promising, with workshop participants keeping the bolts adequately moist. The Tribe plans to inoculate more bolts with Shiitake and to continue growing oyster mushroom. This will, more than likely, become an annual, ongoing project, with Extension oversight.

The presenters thoroughly enjoyed themselves with Bob Beyfuss expressing, “Thanks for the opportunity to present to these nice people!” via email. He provided me with power points and his ginseng resource list on a thumb drive.

Collaborators  

Akwesasne Mohawk Tribe

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program
Program   Franklin - Nutrition Education Local
Educators   Vanetta M. Conn
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   Yes
Executive Summary  

The Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program addresses the physical, emotional and psychological impacts and symptoms of aging and chronic diseases such as the many forms of arthritis.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

As people age, many experience decreased range of motion due to arthritis, rheumatic diseases or other musculoskeletal conditions. Incorporating social engagement and exercises adapted to seated, standing or on the floor, the program meets the needs of participants with differing capabilities and joint involvement.

Extension Responses  

In conjunction with Franklin County Office for the Aging, CCE Franklin provided two series of Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program (AFEP), one meeting twice a week at the Malone Adult Center in northern Franklin County and one in the south end of the county at the Saranac Lake Adult Center that met once each week.

 Each session is concluded with a stress reduction exercise.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

A caption in the October Senior Outlook, the monthly newsletter of the Saranac Lake Adult Center, read: “Having fun and exercising all at the same time.” Unlike many exercise programs, chit chat during the AFEP is encouraged. Talking assures breathing and increases the social value of the program. It is a time to get together and maintain or increase range of motion, muscle strength, balance and coordination.

 Participants report less joint pain and increased sense of well-being.

 GC shared that she incorporated class exercises that stretched her toes and feet. Now she experiences much less cramping in her feet.

CC reported and demonstrated significant increase in balance by maintaining a balance position for several minutes. Pleased with her increased sense of well-being, CC frequently invites and encourages others to join the program.

 JR expressed concerned about an upcoming stress test. The educator provided JR with a copy of one of the relaxation exercises. The following week JR reported that the exercise helped her to cope with the test.

 Program participants encourage each other during the program and invite friends to join them.

Collaborators  

Franklin County Office for the Aging, Malone Adult Center, Saranac Lake Adult Center and Eastern Adirondack Health Care Network

Special funding sources (if any)  

Franklin County Office for the Aging. Eastern Adirondack Health Care Network supplied training for two educators and support materials.


Story Title   Branding CCE Franklin
Program   Franklin - *Current/Emerging Issues*
Educators   Vanetta M. Conn
Pat Banker
Andrew Carpino
Casey L Sukeforth
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   Yes
Executive Summary  

A consistent identity or brand increases public and community awareness of CCE Franklin. In turn, CCE Franklin provides positive impact to residents through a variety of programs and informational articles.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Franklin County citizens desire and need a link between numerous research and evidence based programs, emerging and expanding research and additional sources of credible, valid and reliable information.

Extension Responses  

CCE Franklin provides local programming in schools, on farms and at various venues throughout the community. To increase awareness and provide direct communication of past and future programs, CCE Franklin works to create a consistent presence or brand via local publications, our website, Facebook and Twitter. We share information from numerous credible sources and help local citizens benefit from the Land Grant College system.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Members of CCE Franklin staff provide weekly news articles to ten different local and regional publications. These news articles report on upcoming programming and detail past programs to share the value of CCE Franklin programs with local community members. Other topics include updates to help local farmers understand current trends in weather and pests in order to make timely decisions regarding planting, fertilizing, pest management and harvesting crops. Information on food safety, physical activity, and other nutritional information including recipes increase the well-being and safety of children, parents, seniors and individuals in our community. The bi-weekly articles from our Horticulture educator are greatly anticipated, read as community favorite.

 

For members of our community who do not receive or read local publications, CCE Franklin updates our website with these articles and other timely communications. Over the past year, website visits have increased significantly. Updates on our website are shared via social media outlets including Facebook and Twitter.  As an indication of brand recognition and value, our following on these outlets continue to grow and increase.

 Facebook posts and videos increased awareness of CCE Franklin many fold. Videos from the Dairy Day Parade reached in excess of 1,300 views.

Collaborators  

Malone Telegram, Press Republican, Indian Times, Tupper Lake Free Press, Watertown Daily Times, Observer-Dispatch, Adirondack Daily News, Adirondack Almanac, Champlain Weekly, the Sun Community News, County Association-Based Shared Web Platform Project

Special funding sources (if any)  

Franklin County Legislators


Story Title   Building Bike Safety Throughout Franklin County
Program   Franklin - Nutrition Education Local
Educators   Vanetta M. Conn
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   Yes
Executive Summary  

Youth who own the proper safety equipment and use it, who know and utilize the knowledge and laws that govern riding bicycles and knowledge of bike safety practices can use their bicycles safely for recreation and transportation. Riding bicycles increases physical activity.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

The parents of youth in Franklin County often lack resources to provide their children with the proper and required safety equipment for riding their bikes. Rules of the road apply to bicycles in the same manner as they do other vehicles. Not all parents and caregivers realize the increased safety in following the rules of the road and being predictable when riding bicycles.

Extension Responses  

CCE Franklin provided bicycle safety education and bike helmet fitting in several venues throughout Franklin County while working with Malone Complete Streets, Franklin County Public Health, the North Country Healthy Heart Network and the Franklin County Transportation Safety Board.

 

Youth and adults learned how to properly fit bike helmets and how a properly fitted helmet protects the skull and brain. They learned the importance of wearing bright colored clothing in order to increase visibility to motorist and why they are expected to riding on the right and walk on the left hand side of the road.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

At one rural school, just over one hundred youth each received a properly fitted bike helmet. The youth with educator guidance partook in fitting their own helmet and assisting classmates to do the same. This hands on education enabled them to share with their adults how to assure that any needed replacement would be properly fitted or assist in the fitting of a sibling’s helmet.

Youth illustrated their understanding of the need for bright colors by requesting yellow helmets over the other choices of blue or red.

 

Volunteers and representatives from the Franklin County Transportation Safety Board assisted CCE Franklin when additional helmets and education were provided at two summer bike rodeos. Several adults approached educators with requests for helmets so that they could be good examples to local youth by wearing helmets when they rode their bikes.

Collaborators  

Malone Complete Streets, Franklin County Public Health, the North Country Healthy Heart Network, St. Regis Falls Central Schools, Malone Recreation Park and the Franklin County Transportation Safety Board

Special funding sources (if any)  

Franklin County Board of Legislators. Helmets provided through Safe Routes to School grant obtained by Franklin County Public Health and the North Country Healthy Heart Network.


Story Title   CCE Addresses Interest and Need for Safety in Food Preservation Practices
Program   Franklin - Ag & Natural Resources - Horticulture
Educators   Pat Banker
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

CCE provides science based hands-on and classroom training in food preservation and food safety for a wide range of needs including wild game and other wild edibles addressing the needs of the Native American people of Akwesasne.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Requests were made by the Akwesasne Cultural Preservation program and the Freedom School for classes that would teach the safest methods of preserving a vast array of wild game, herbs, heritage foods and other culturally important food items. It was reported that methods were being used that often resulted in a great loss of home grown produce and traditionally procured foods.

Per the National Center for Home Food Preservation, home food preservation remains an important and popular cultural activity. It is critical that those who practice preserving and processing foods at home have access to the most reliable information available concerning food safety and food quality. The Cooperative Extension System and USDA have historically been recognized by the industry, educators and many consumers as credible sources for science-based recommendations and instruction.

Two national surveys conducted by the National Center for Home Food Preservation (in 2000 and 2005) revealed a high percentage of home food processors are using
practices that put them at high risk for foodborne illness and economic losses due to food spoilage. It was found that a significant percentage of home canners use practices for processing low-acid foods that put them at high risk for botulism. These include the use of very low processing temperatures or no processing at all after filling jars (open kettle method). There were also practices reported for canning of high acid foods that put people at risk for food spoilage and potential illness from under-processed food. Many physical injuries were reported from using techniques that were found to be dangerous such as oven canning and the use of steam canning.

Extension Responses  

CCE Certified Master Food Preservation instructors met with leaders within the community to address the needs and concerns specific to Native Americans. Classes were offered at several venues covering the wide range of food preservation methods available.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

CCE provided 3 venues for two and three-day Master Food Preservation courses and two one day Wild Edible Workshops. Master Hunters and Fishermen provided the game and fish. Master Medicine people and gardeners provided heritage produce. Participants learned science based, safe methods for pressure canning everything from fish with the bone intact to canning muskrat and moose. Processing whole Canadian goose, wild turkey and other game birds utilizing all edible parts of the birds was also completed.
Classes also provided hands-on and classroom training in identifying wild edible plants, roots, tree barks, and herbs and how to preserve and utilize them.

Collaborators  

Akwesasne Cultural Preservation, Freedom School, and Camp Treetops

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   CCE is Up for the Challenge!
Program   Franklin - 4-H Youth Development
Educators   Diane R. Dumont
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Franklin County’s Family Health and Wellness department provided 10 hours of nutrition and physical education to over 500 youth at Davis Elementary school.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

“The prevalence of obesity among U.S. school-aged children (6-11 years) was 17.5%” (CDC, 2015)
“Obesity disproportionally affects children from low-income families” (CDC, 2014)
“18.5% of people in Franklin County are in poverty” (census.gov, 2010)
“Intervention has positive impact on pattern of nutrition, and it can be concluded that intervention is effective on increasing or improving the knowledge, attitude, and performance of the students.” (National Library of Medicine, 2015)

Extension Responses  

CCE collaborated with the Physical Education department of Davis Elementary school in order to provide ten hours of nutrition/physical education to students in grades K-5. Programming took place on Tuesday and Wednesday every week for eleven weeks, using the 4-H “Up for the Challenge” curriculum. Lessons in the curriculum ranged from different types of exercise, to the different food groups, and healthy snack and drink choices. Upon completion of the lesson, a physical activity related to the material was implemented. During the tenth week, a post test was given to the students who were able to provide feedback for the “Up for the Challenge” curriculum and the educator.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Nutrition education provided in the schools proved beneficial to countless youth at Davis Elementary. Multiple faculty members with children in the school reported their children “Choosing healthier snacks while shopping”, “Spending lots of time reading the nutrition facts labels both in the house and at the store”, “Picking healthy drinks instead of soda”, and “Constantly reminding me about MyPlate during meals”. Aids in the cafeteria have reported that children will “openly talk about the foods they brought in and compare their nutritional value”. The retention rate of the nutrition education is very high, with students from grades 1-5 bringing up material from previous education years prior. The Physical Education staff at Davis Elementary are very eager for Cornell Cooperative Extension’s return.

Collaborators  

Malone Central School District, Greater Malone Area YMCA

Special funding sources (if any)  

Walmart, United Health Care


Story Title   Composting and Recycling Grant Spreads Knowledge to North Country Youth
Program   Franklin - 4-H Youth Development
Educators   Casey L Sukeforth
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

4-H Camp Overlook was one of three camps involved with an EPA grant to start a composting program as well as increase our recycling efforts. The program included education to over 700 Camp Overlook Summer campers as well as the local youth who attend our school programs. Over 1200 children who visited Camp Overlook received composting and recycling curriculum, and over 800 pounds of food waste was diverted to a compost pile instead of a landfill.  Campers surveyed after indicated that many planned to increase their own recycling and start their own compost piles.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

The EPA sites that in 2014, about 136 million tons of Municipal Solid Waste were land filled. Food was the largest component (being over 21 percent). Northern New York and its landfills are adversely affected by a lack of composting and recycling. The EPA grant proposed an increase in environmental literacy and encourage behavior that benefits the environment will affect our local community in two ways.  The first pathway the school age youth will be directly exposed to a detailed understanding of the effects on the environment due to the lack of composting and recycling in a way that the youth may analyze, evaluate, problem solve, make informed decisions, take immediate action and future action.  The second pathway is the three rural camps will practice safe waste management and recycle practices leading to long term stewardship and a positive attitude change towards the enhancement of the natural environment. The audience being served is disproportionately impacted by rural low income communities.  Across the three camps, 38% of the campers are on scholarship – due to low economic status. 

Extension Responses  

With funds supplied by the grant, camp built a 3 bin compost system, place recycling receptacles in each camp and meeting space, and invested in many educational tools for campers to study our compost. 4-H Camp Overlook developed a stewardship plan as well as attended three pre-camp trainings with the EPA and Cornell Waste Management institute to develop curriculum for the campers. Also in attendance was our summer Environmental Education Director, who helped shape the curriculum to fit Camp Overlook’s campers and daily schedule. Summer campers received daily mini-compost lessons before meals, and campers enrolled in our environmental education classes got more in-depth composting and recycling curriculum. During the spring and fall the recycling curriculum was given during conservation field days.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Daily composting and the curriculum were implemented in the spring and during residential camp. Over the course of the program 4-H Camp composted over 800 pounds of waste, which would have normally gone to a landfill. Over 1200 local youth learned about 4-H Camp overlooks recycling and composting efforts. Composting was successful and encouraged behavior changes in our kitchen staff. Composting will continue beyond the grant proposal because of ease and efficiency. After action survey of campers showed an increase in composting and recycling knowledge, as well as many site behavior changes.

Collaborators  

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Jefferson County, 4-H Camp Wabasso, Oswegatchie Outdoor Learning Center, New York FFA Leadership Training Foundation, Cornell Waste Management institute, Environmental Protection Agency, Casella Waste Management.

Special funding sources (if any)  

Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Education Local Grants Program


Story Title   Cornell Cooperative Extension Saves The (afterschool) Day…AGAIN!
Program   Franklin - 4-H Youth Development
Educators   Abby Langdon
Steve M. McDonald
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

4-H Youth Development department of Cornell Cooperative Extension Franklin County provides comprehensive afterschool childcare with the inclusion of school enrichments activities.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

“Health-related factors such as hunger, physical and emotional abuse, and chronic illness can lead to poor school performance. Health-risk behaviors such as early sexual initiation, violence, and physical inactivity are consistently linked to poor grades and test scores and lower educational attainment” (CDC, 2015)
“Research shows that children who participate in quality afterschool programs have higher school attendance, academic achievement, and are less likely to be involved in risky behaviors during the afterschool hours” (ocfs.ny.gov, 2016).
There are 2,125 single parent households with children under 18 years of age in Franklin County (Census.gov, 2010). Single parent households have more trouble obtaining quality afterschool childcare (ocfs.ny.gov, 2016).
Brushton-Moira central’s superintendent, Donna Andre, contacted CCE of Franklin County to create an afterschool program. Mrs. Andre was looking for something similar to that of the pre-existing program created by CCE in Chateauguay to extend the school day for the district families in need of those services.

Extension Responses  

Partnering with NYS OCFS (Office of Child and Family Services) CCE obtained a license and provided a comprehensive affordable afterschool childcare program to the Brushton-Moira School District. The program includes weekly school enrichment activities sourced from 4-H curricula. Some of the curricula used included “Project Wet”, “Project Seasons”, GIS activities and many more. High school teens were hired as mentors to assist youth with homework and school projects during the afterschool program to strengthen academics with ultimate goal to improve graduation rates. In addition, each program participant was also provided with a daily snack that follows NYS healthy school’s guidelines. This program is intended to decrease many common health-risk behaviors for youth that are linked to lower educational attainment.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Since the start of the Panther Hour afterschool program there have been several positive responses from parents, district staff and representatives, and students. Often times parents choose to let their child(ren) stay longer. They return at the end of programing to pick up students engulfed in the current school enrichment activity. One parent has said “I feel so relieved that my child likes staying here so much I have to reassure her she can come back tomorrow”. Another parent has stated “I was constantly worried I couldn’t help (name omitted) with his homework. With this program I feel more at ease knowing he will get it done.” District superintendent, Donna Andre, often praises Panther Hour staff and is delighted to observe the program regularly.
The ability to allow students age 16-18 the opportunity for first time job experience has also showed a positive impact and success of Panther Hour.

Collaborators  

NYS Office of Child and Family Services, Brushton-Moira Central School District

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   Cornell Cooperative Extension Summer Programming for At-Risk Youth
Program   Franklin - 4-H Youth Development
Educators   Abby Langdon
Daniel Rexford Sweet
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   Yes
Executive Summary  

4-H Youth Development department of Cornell Cooperative Extension Franklin County provides summer programming to Salmon River Central School District families.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

“The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports U.S. youth spending 55 hours a week in front of a screen. Obesity in Franklin County is an astounding 36.5%, well above the NYS rate of 24.5%. The spike can be directly linked to the county’s high poverty rate and the lack of organized activities made available to low income families.”

“Research shows that children who participate in quality afterschool programs have higher school attendance and academic achievement, are less likely to be involved in risky behaviors during the afterschool hours.” (ocfs.ny.gov, 2016)

What we have noticed is that youth in grades 5-8 may attend the 4-H afterschool program, but have nothing to keep them engaged throughout the summer. CCE stepped in and provided summer programming to keep the youth active and away from engaging in risky behaviors, as well as keeping time spent in front of a television/computer screen down.

Extension Responses  

Over the summer, CCE provided both recreational and educational activities for youth enrolled in 4-H National Mentoring Program. There were a total of three summer events, two for the 4-H youth only and one family event. During our barbeque/bowling event at the Malone Memorial Recreation Park, icebreakers and team building activities were implemented in order for youth to create new friendships and get to know each other. At Rainbow Park in Fort Covington, the children were taught how to use GPS/GIS technology while geocaching. The final event of the summer was a family day trip to the Franklin County Fair, where CCE provided the transportation and day passes for entry. A photo scavenger hunt was given to the families in order to visit a variety of locations at the fair, while encouraging family bonding time.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Youth enrolled with the Akwesasne Mentoring Program at Salmon River Central attended the summer programming events. While the youth were excited for both educational and recreational activities, parents were grateful for, “Keeping the kids active and away from electronics”. During our family day outing event located at the Franklin County Fair, parents expressed their gratitude and enthusiasm for a family oriented opportunity. Parents and family members of three different mentee’s families who had previously not attended any family events, participated in the Fair outing because it was “fun and engaging” and “not your typical family event”. When school started back up in September, mentees who had attended the summer programming events were delighted to share their experiences, and reconnect with other mentees who had forged new friendships.

Collaborators  

Salmon River Central School District, JCEO of Franklin County, Rainbow Recreation Park, Malone Memorial Recreation Park

Special funding sources (if any)  

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, National 4-H


Story Title   Environmental Education trip to 4-H Camp Overlook gives Students a much needed Connection to the Natural World
Program   Franklin - 4-H Youth Development
Educators   Casey L Sukeforth
Richard L. Gast
Pat Banker
Andrew Carpino
Steve M. McDonald
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

Recent studies have found that American children see the environment as a very serious problem and that previous generations have not done enough to address it.  The Nature Conservancy found that if youth are given more opportunities to have a meaningful outdoor experience, they will be more likely to value nature, engage with it, and feel empowered to do something to protect it.  Yet over 60% of youth report that they don’t spend more time outdoors because of a lack of access. Brushton-Moira school district traveled to 4-H Camp Overlook to receive valuable hands on environmental education curriculum this fall that they could not get in the traditional classroom, and over 546 students visited camp for conservation field days.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

The National Science Foundation’s Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education states "in the coming decades, the public will more frequently be called upon to understand complex environmental issues, assess risk, evaluate proposed environmental plans and understand how individual decisions affect the environment at local and global scales. Creating a scientifically informed citizenry requires a concerted, systematic approach to environmental education. Nature Conservancy has found that 88% of American youth are online every day in an average week only 40% are spending any significant time outdoors.   The majority of American children see the environment as a very serious problem and that previous generations have not done enough to address it. According to the Foundation for Youth Investment, Environmental Education and youth development programs can help young people develop academic skills, self-confidence, and connections to the places where they live.

Extension Responses  

4-H Camp Overlook has developed a place based environmental education program that gets students outside.  Teachers can choose classes that help round their existing classroom curriculum including wild edibles, invasive species, wildlife ecology, and orienteering. Hosting these classes at camp allows students to see concepts they have learned about in the classroom, but also gives them quality time outside.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

 Youth gained experience and knowledge in botany, ecology, conservation, wildlife regulations, civic responsibility, and stewardship. 

Collaborators  

NYS 4-H Curriculum, Brushton-Moira School district, Malone School District, Chateaugay School District, Soil and Water, EPA

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   Franklin County 4-H Dairy Program Grows
Program   Franklin - 4-H Youth Development
Educators   Diane R. Dumont
Steve M. McDonald
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

Franklin County youth have the opportunity to learn about raising dairy calves and the value of working with purebred animals through lease option.

Issues /Needs: Changes in the dairy industry have made it more difficult for our historical pedigree farms to survive. The declining number of active purebred operations led to fewer opportunities for 4-H members to own their own registered calf. This results in less participation in our 4-H dairy project program.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Changes in the dairy industry have made it more difficult for our historical pedigree farms to survive. The declining number of active purebred operations led to fewer opportunities for 4-H members to own their own registered calf. This results in less participation in our 4-H dairy project program.

Extension Responses  

Franklin CCE 4-H Youth Development staff decided to consciously promote the idea of leasing calves between area registered dairy breeders and interested youth. Purebred dairymen and women were receptive and supportive of the idea. Written agreements were made between participating youth and animal owner. These agreements included the use of a calf in exchange for farm labor (help with chores). The arrangement further educated youth on all aspects of the dairy industry above and beyond animal care.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

4-H members developed skills necessary to exhibit their leased animals at the Franklin County Fair and the New York State Fair by attending the northern New York “Dairy Camp” hosted by Franklin County.
Many youth, who otherwise wouldn’t, had the opportunity to participate in the Franklin County Animal Science Program, due to the leasing option. CCE staff and volunteers alike watched as they grew along with their animals and developed lasting relationships with local purebred breeders.
Youth have learned firsthand how to grow, fit, judge, travel, win, lose, and smile knowing a helping hand and words of encouragement are always near. They know the disappointment of ringworm, warts, and an unruly calf in the show ring. Participants have gained knowledge and leadership skills in and out of the show ring that will last a lifetime.
Parents and volunteer leader participation in this year’s 4-H dairy program has grown tremendously because of the animal leasing option. For many, who grew up on dairy farms, the animal leasing program afforded them the opportunity to carry on traditions and friendships from earlier 4-H involvement. 42 youth attended our 2016 “Dairy Camp” with 50% leasing animals. Likewise, the Franklin County Ag Society reports their “Open Show” has grown as a result of Franklin County CCE’s 4-H “animal lease” option.

Collaborators  

4-H Volunteers, Franklin County Agriculture Society, Purebred Dairy Breeders

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   Garden Planning
Program   Franklin - Ag & Natural Resources - Horticulture
Educators   Richard L. Gast
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

Whether a large garden in the country, a backyard garden at your home, a raised bed vegetable garden, or containers outside of an apartment, there are several things which need to be considered, especially for those new to gardening.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Every year, I find myself speaking with more and more first-time landscape and vegetable gardeners. And, although their reasons for getting into gardening are many (fun, family activity, outdoor recreation, exercise, worries about food safety), for vegetable gardeners, the leading incentive seems to be the ever-increasing cost of food. As rising food costs take a bigger and bigger bite out of family budgets, growing food, or at least some of it, can be a great way to save money. In fact, a few plants and some canning equipment and / or a bit of freezer space can save a lot of money. And growing your own vegetables is a great way to eat healthier.

First time gardeners often plant more than they can easily maintain and, because of this, they fail. Weeds and pests need to be controlled and the time and commitment that this requires, especially in a large garden, cannot be overstated. All gardeners experience problems. A lot of knowledge is not required. Understanding a few basics is. It’s amazing what can come of some imagination and a little effort.

Extension Responses  

A workshop was created as a way to guide participants through the process of devising a practical garden plan. The workshop is geared to

Helping attendees get an idea of just how big an area they are planning to redesign or will need to accommodate everything that he or she is planning to grow (and just how realistic or unrealistic those gardening plans actually are). It provided an opportunity for beginners to learn the basics of garden planning, a review for gardeners who are hobbyists, and an opportunity for dedicated gardeners to examine pointers and techniques for making their gardening experience even more meaningful and enjoyable.

The program examined the basics of planning out a garden bed such as spacing, design, sun / shade exposure, when / where to plant certain crops, managing pests, expanding the gardening season, and building and caring for the soil.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Participants left with a greater understanding of how to create a garden plan, (whether for hobby or homestead gardening), how to select the best plants and / or crops for their landscape and / or vegetable gardens, when to plant to take full advantage of the growing season from spring to fall, how to get the most out of limited space, and how to obtain the resources needed to get started in the upcoming growing season, along with practical ideas for building sustainability into their organizing and gardening for years to come.

One group of local gardeners have taken what they learned and applied it a large, organized community gardening project, consisting of several large, fairly productive plots, which they are managing with the sole purpose of providing needy individuals and families within their local community with wholesome, nutritious food. They have a cannery onsite, as well.

They have and provided and are providing disadvantaged area residents with fresh, high-quality vegetables and fruit.

Their program is planning to increase production sustainability for many years to come.

Collaborators  

Paul Smiths College, Akwessasne community

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   Gardening with Children; Train the Trainer
Program   Franklin - Ag & Natural Resources - Horticulture
Educators   Richard L. Gast
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

Gardening gives children a chance to learn an important life skill, one that is overlooked in standard school curricula, and provides an excellent method for teaching environmental awareness through exploring the workings of nature.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Franklin County towns and villages have been hurt by regional isolation, economic backwardness, blight, and disinvestment. Many Franklin County children, even those with working (single) parents, are growing up facing family risk factors, such as poverty, single parenthood, and low parental education levels, all of which may undermine development.

The value of instilling, in those children, an appreciation for gardening; teaching them to enjoy planting, caring for, and growing healthy garden plants and wholesome, nutritious food, cannot be understated. Gardening supports constructive growth and engaging the child in a meaningful experience. Children who learn to garden acquire new life skills, which can increase their (and their family’s) food security.

A garden, even a small container, group of containers, or raised bed offers young children and at-risk young children a place for play, inquiry, learning about and interacting with the natural world (i.e. becoming aware of the life cycle of plants or happening upon a small snake or group of beneficial insects), while building relationships with other young people and their mentors.

Teaching children to garden is engaging and often interactive. It can excite kids to not only learn more about healthy, fresh foods but to actually cook and eat them, as well!

Several social workers who are work with children as daycare providers, caregivers, counselors, and early childhood educators, expressed an interest in learning about creating and implementing gardening programs for children; programs that can make growing healthy foods and learning about nutrition fun.

Extension Responses  

Extension provided an extensive slide show and lecture program detailing successful children’s gardening programs that we have implemented in the past; among them several container gardening and raised bed gardening programs; along with the methodology for achieving success, or perhaps I should say avoiding failure, when implementing a children’s gardening program or when gardening with children; whether the program involves planting and caring for one plant in a single pot or an onsite (raised bed) garden or gardens.

At the conclusion of the lecture, containers and pepper plants were provided and the attending group of social workers, many who had no prior gardening experience, transplanted starter pepper plants into containers.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

One of the best way for preschoolers to learn about plants and their life cycle and growth, is by planting and caring for flowers and vegetables. Gardening can be part of an active, healthy lifestyle. Learning to grow food can also, in time, help individuals and families attain greater food security by growing sufficient quantities of safe, nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences.                                                                               

Many of the social workers that attended used the container gardening techniques they’d acquired to duplicate the container gardening portion of the program with their clients and in some cases with their client-families. They had fun and were, in most cases, successful.

I have been asked to follow up next year with a similar train the trainer composting program.

Collaborators  

Akwessane community, Paul Smiths College VIC, Bonesteels Garden Center

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   Growing Stronger
Program   Franklin - Growing Stronger
Educators   Vanetta M. Conn
Daniel Rexford Sweet
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   Yes
Executive Summary  

Research indicates that strength-training programs like Growing Stronger are a safe and effective way to maintain the ability to do the things we want to do and remain independent as we age.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Persons over the age of 50 years are at a greater risk of losing their balance and falling due to loss of muscle strength, experience loss of bone density which increases the risk of broken bones, and possible reduction of sleep quality, self-confidence and self-esteem.

Extension Responses  

CCE Franklin offered the Growing Stronger Program at two locations in Franklin County. One of the programs collaborates with a local hospital and church to provide the series in a continuous and ongoing manner. The second uses funding through an Office for the Aging to offer the program for about half the year. 

Accomplishments and Impacts  

The Growing Stronger program grows as satisfied participants share with their friends and families the many benefits. In order to keep the continuous program ongoing, participants have volunteered for leader training. These volunteers step up to lead the program and assist newcomers in remaining safe while becoming familiar with the routine. This year, our volunteers enabled the program at the local church to expand to meeting three times each week. The program at the Office for the Aging seeks funding in order to sustain this program in the coming year.

 

When facilitating the Growing Stronger program, I repeatedly hear from participants the many benefits that they receive. They tell stories about a wide range of changes they have made or seen in their lives since beginning the program. 

 

“I passed my yearly physical with flying colors and even lost some weight. I have come to like best the exercise I previously hated most. It has reshaped my body and decreased my waist. ” 

 

“Thank you for helping me adapt the exercises to fit my needs. Alternating from side to side enables me to increase my strength without pain.”

 

“We want to make this program easier for our seniors to participate in. Next year we will have all our exercise programs take place on Tuesdays and Thursdays at the same time so clients can move from one program to the next seamlessly. Your series is so popular we want it to last for half the year.”

 

“I feel so much better. I am stronger and my balance is better. I will look for a similar program while I am in Florida this winter.”

 

“Make sure I know when the next program begins.”

 

“I haven’t had to go to the chiropractor since beginning the program.”

 

“I don’t think I would exercise if I didn’t have Growing Stronger to come to.”

 

A local Nurse Practitioner consistently refers clients to the program. She states that even if they are not ready for physical activity today, I want them to know there are programs available that meet their needs. Remarks like these and many other reported changes in peoples’ lives make Growing Stronger one of my favorite programs to facilitate.  Additionally, the program is fun and enjoyable as well as life improving. Many of our new participants are recruited by friends who continue to be engaged in Growing Stronger.

Collaborators  

Eastern Adirondack Healthcare Network, Alice Hyde Medical Center, First Congregational Church, St. Regis Mohawk Tribe Office for the Aging, Retired Senior Volunteer Program, Adirondack Medical Home

Special funding sources (if any)  

Franklin County Legislators, St. Regis Mohawk Tribe Office for the Aging, Eastern Adirondack Healthcare Network, Adirondack Medical Home


Story Title   Increased Staff Training Results in Homesick Campers Staying at Camp
Program   Franklin - 4-H Youth Development
Educators   Casey L Sukeforth
Mackenzie A. Spillane
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

In being a residential camp we always have the few campers who are not quite ready to be away from home for an entire week.  Usually the main reason campers are sent home before the end of the week is due to homesickness. This summer 2016 season 4-H Camp Overlook directed more time training our counselor staff to prevent homesickness from happening.  We set aside many hours to openly discuss ways to nip homesickness in the bud and developed a series of changes to staff training and camp schedule to help keep campers happily involved in our program. We can proudly say we didn’t send one camper home early for homesickness this year.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Many homesick campers that stay for the entire week will say they are happy they experienced camp for the entire time, and more often than not they will come back again the following year.  Making sure the counseling staff are equipped with handling homesickness is major for encouraging a child to stay at camp and have a good time doing so.  For many families camp can be expensive, when their child has a great experience at camp it is encouraging to parents that their money was well spent and sets us up for more camper return the following year.       

Extension Responses  

Many meetings during staff training were dedicated to battling homesickness. We held open discussions between senior staff, return staff, and new staff to answer questions or work through any potential homesickness scenarios.  Returning staff shared their stories on what approaches worked on helping campers feel more comfortable at camp and new staff practiced handling potential situations. We also rearranged the Sunday schedule to better meet the needs of brand new campers, the best way of helping campers adapt to a new situation is getting them involved in the program.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Setting aside important time on homesickness during staff training directly resulted in having no campers sent home for homesickness during the entire summer. The extra discussions also helped the counseling staff work better as a unit and use each other as resources in combating homesickness.

Collaborators  

Melissa Michno 4-H Camp Overlook Summer Camp Director

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   Internship Filled by Long Term Camp Alumna
Program   Franklin - 4-H Youth Development
Educators   Casey L Sukeforth
Mackenzie A. Spillane
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

A new internship position was added to help the year round programming of 4-H Camp overlook this fall. Camp alumna Mackenzie Spillane filled the position in efforts to complete her bachelor’s degree from The College at Brockport, State University of New York. Mackenzie has been a part of camp life since she was 5 years old as a Cloverbud camper, eventually becoming a counselor at 17 and then taking the position of assistant director at 21 in 2015.  Her knowledge of camp contributed to a smooth and helpful transition into leading programs for year round groups and preparation for the 2017 summer camp session.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

This new internship position allows the opportunity for Mackenzie or any local college student to put their education into real scenarios and obtain the experience they need in the work force. This also opens a tie to The College at Brockport, State University of New York, as Mackenzie is currently enrolled as a student. 4-H was able to spend less time training Mackenzie in preparation for her internship as she already understands the workings of the organization.

Extension Responses  

During her internship Mackenzie has been given the opportunity to facilitate and plan for school groups attending camp for teambuilding activities, teach at conservation field days, edit the handbook for training summer camp staff, market job openings for camp, and assist in developing new class curriculum for the summer camp session.  In accomplishing these tasks Mackenzie will gain a complete understanding of the workings within a year round recreation organization.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Having an extra hand on year round programming staff has helped camp run in the busy months of October and September without a hitch.  Having Mackenzie as an intern has also welcomed a long term association with The College at Brockport, State University of New York by 4H Camp overlook becoming an approved full semester internship site for the Recreation and Leisure department. Mackenzie learned about the state extension office and the workings of a non-profit, as well as demonstrated and applied ability to assist with planning and implementation our year-round adventure programming.

 

Collaborators  

The College at Brockport State University of New York; Arthur Graham, Internship Coordinator, Dept. of Recreation and Leisure Studies, The College at Brockport

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   Invasive Invaders - Invasive Species and the Threats They Pose
Program   Franklin - Ag & Natural Resources - Horticulture
Educators   Richard L. Gast
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

High School-aged youth can have a fundamental role in protecting our region’s parks, landscapes, forests, agricultural crops, and gardens from invasive species, if they are provided with easy to understand information that stimulates critical thinking, reading, inquiry, and investigation into the ecosystems and natural resources of this North Country / Adirondack region and how species introduced into these environments, either accidentally or intentionally, have resulted, or may result, in negative impacts to the ecological communities of the infested areas, and to industries which are vital to the economic stability of the region, including forestry, tourism and recreation, agriculture, and aquaculture.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Northern New York possesses great natural beauty and biological diversity; both important sources of economic strength. However, the region's (and the state’s) native species are threatened by invading plants, animals, insects, and diseases. As travel and trade increase, the risk of new invasions also increases.

 

Invasive species have the potential to devastate key industries including, agriculture, timber, and recreation (i.e. boating, fishing, hunting, and gardening) and to destabilize soil and alter the hydrology of streams, rivers, lakes, and wetlands.

 

Invasive plants, insects, and diseases are of great concern to farmers because they can reduce crop yields and many are unpalatable or toxic to livestock. Several invasive species are of concern to forestland and woodlot managers because they are now impacting the composition of our native forests or threatening to impact the composition of our native forests over time.

 

A science teacher with environmental education responsibilities at one of Franklin County’s high schools specifically requested that a presentation addressing invasive species and their impacts be included as part of a day of outdoor education at 4H Camp Overlook. For most of the students, the presentation would be an introduction to invasive species and the issues related to invasive species and their impacts.

 

The presentation would be part of a greater program consisting of several segments of experiential-learning classes designed to encourage students to reflect upon the relevance of the natural world and to engage those students in ways that motivate them to aspire to developing the practical skills needed to assume their roles as stewards of the environment.

Extension Responses  

I prepared an age-appropriate presentation and turned to the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant program (APIPP), a partnership program founded by the Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, New York State Department of Transportation and New York State Adirondack Park Agency that has grown to include more than 30 cooperating organizations, and over 700 volunteers, for handout information that could double as material for the teacher to follow up with. APIPP provided top-notch materials on:

1) invasive terrestrial and aquatic animals and

2) invasive terrestrial and aquatic plants that are either currently negatively impacting important Adirondack ecosystems, agricultural lands, and state and private forests or that represent a potential risk to scenic, natural, agricultural or recreational resources.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Feedback from the students’ teacher, about both the program and the handout materials, was extremely positive. She indicated that she would use the materials to follow up with the students, encouraging them to revisit some of what was presented and to see that the learning objectives are adequately achieved.

 

Collaborators  

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant program (APIPP), the Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, New York State Department of Transportation and New York State Adirondack Park Agency

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   Malone Complete Streets
Program   Franklin - Nutrition Education Local
Educators   Vanetta M. Conn
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   Yes
Executive Summary  

Community collaboration makes environmental and policy changes to make walking and biking easier and safer for Malone residents.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Increased over weight and obesity, decline in downtown shopping corridor and unsafe conditions for walking and biking to school create diminished fiscal and physical well-being for the residents of the Town and Village of Malone.  

Extension Responses  

CCE Franklin worked closely with the Malone Complete Streets program from the time of inception, through the development of a comprehensive plan and policy and continues to act as an advisor to the committee now that it is an official Advisory Board to the Town and Village of Malone.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

CCE Franklin worked with the Malone Complete Streets Partnership since 2010 before it was called Complete Streets. Lead by the North Country Healthy Heart Network, funded by a Capacity Building for Healthier Communities grant from the New York State Department of Health, CCE Franklin and representatives from many agencies, local government and local schools from throughout Northern Franklin County came together to receive education and explore the possibilities of policy and environmental change for making it easier to walk and bike, accommodate all modes of transportation and improve the well-being of local families, seniors and individuals.

 

Members of the partnership reviewed and looked at the many varied benefits of a Complete Streets Policy and Plan. These benefits range from better health and well-being for individuals to better health for local business. Some examples include increasing mobility for people of all ages and physical abilities or disabilities, promoting active living and good health for all, safety for all ages, and economic revitalization for local business.  As a group, we decided that we wanted our community to experience the benefits and to pursue and develop a Complete Streets policy. Both the Town of Malone and the Village of Malone supported resolutions for creating a Complete Streets Policy.

 

The process began with education and evaluation of local conditions regarding walking, biking and traffic patterns. Together, the group reviewed and prioritized conditions, possible solutions and barriers. A time consuming process and labor of love for many of committed representatives involved in the partnership. Out of this process came the Malone Complete Streets Plan. In 2016, a grant facilitated through the Eastern Adirondack Health Care Network improved the walking paths through Arsenal Green Park in the center of the Village of Malone. The Complete Street board plans to apply for additional funding in 2017 for further sidewalk improvements in this park.

 

The overarching and long term impacts of the Malone Complete Streets Board include:

1.  achieve walkable and bikeable neighborhoods in Malone;

2.  prioritize and support safety in these neighborhoods;

3.  create routes that connect neighborhoods, parks and economic centers;

4.  promote good health through movement;

5.  enjoy our beautiful environment by encouraging outdoor activity.

 

The Explore Malone Walk / Bike Challenge provides local residents and tourists ten routes to explore the Malone community. There are five walks, three hikes and two bike routes on an easy to understand map. Anyone who completes the challenge by completing any five routes is recognized for their achievement by the Malone Chamber of Commerce.

Collaborators  

Alice Hyde Medical Center, Eastern Adirondack Health Care Network, Franklin County Board of Legislators, Franklin County Office for the Aging, Franklin County Public Health, Franklin County Soil & Water Conservation District, Franklin County Traffic Safety Board, Healthy Schools New York, Malone Central School District, Malone Revitalization Foundation, Malone Telegram, North Country Healthy Heart Network, Retired Senior Volunteers Program, Town of Malone, Village of Malone

Special funding sources (if any)  

Franklin County Legislators, New York State Department of Health, Eastern Adirondack Health Care Network


Story Title   Medical Home Nutrition & Physical Activity Support
Program   Franklin - Nutrition Education Local
Educators   Vanetta M. Conn
Daniel Rexford Sweet
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   Yes
Executive Summary  

At risk patients of local healthcare providers benefit from developing personal strategies to reduce health risk.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Recently changing paradigm in healthcare moves from responding to illness and disease to prevention and wellness centered. One response includes the creation of the managed care medical home model. Healthcare providers seek to increase knowledge of the link between good nutrition practices and physical activity with better health outcomes.

 

According to the New York State Department of Health 65.2% of adults living in Franklin County are overweight or obese with Body Mass Index (BMI) of 25 or greater. Over 29% of adult residents did not participate in leisure time physical activity in the past 30 and 10.8% of residents have healthcare provider diagnosis of diabetes. People in these categories are at greater risk for chronic disease, illness and even death.

Extension Responses  

Through a contract with the Adirondack Medical Home, CCE Franklin educators meet with patients identified as being at high risk for poor health outcomes by their healthcare providers. Patients are encouraged to participate in programs like Growing Stronger and the Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program for fun group physical activity.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

A Family Health and Well-being educator meets one-on-one with patients referred by their healthcare provider to develop strategies for change. The process begins by discussing what has worked well in the past and identifying possible barriers to success. Then clients are encouraged and assisted with developing individualized goals. To further promote behavior change, clients define their personal goals and what they want change they want to see or achieve. To increase the likelihood of success, goals are created using the SMART format.

 

Discussions include the many benefits of eating a balanced diet, balancing food intake with activity and the importance and role of daily or at least regular physical activity. Clients are encouraged to schedule multiple visits with the educator in order to celebrate changes and improvements or to problem solve barriers. Patients state their intentions to make changes, track food and activity patterns, and participate in regular physical activity including another CCE Franklin programs, like Growing Stronger or the Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program.

Collaborators  

Adirondack Medical Home, Health Care providers in the Adirondack Medical Home system

Special funding sources (if any)  

Adirondack Medical Home


Story Title   Mentee Becomes Site Coordinator Family
Program   Franklin - 4-H Youth Development
Educators   Abby Langdon
Daniel Rexford Sweet
Steve M. McDonald
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

The Office of Juvenile Justice Delinquency Program (OJJDP) grant was awarded to Cornell University Cooperative Extension and subsequently sub- awarded to Franklin County CCE 4-H to establish a Youth and Family with Promise (YFP) Mentoring program at Salmon River Central and the St. Regis Mohawk School. The short term goals are to assist at risk youth academically and socially and to explore additional interests to redirect their attention from crime and drugs. In addition, the grant afforded an opportunity to provide family night outings as means to strengthen family bonds.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Like many rural communities, the families and youth of the Mohawk Nation and Non-Native communities in which we serve, are limited by their lack of economic stability and the lack of a cohesive family atmosphere. More often than not children will be residing in a single parent/guardian family dwelling; weekends with a separated a parent and/or be under the care of a tóta (Mohawk for Grandmother). The Love our Family Pasta Bash was created to provide families an opportunity to come together and enjoy an atmosphere of open communication. In one unfortunate situation, a family did not “remember” to attend the Family Night Outing. Therefore, the child (Jayden) was let down and was tremendously distraught with his parent’s lack of attendance. Specifically, Jayden is a very high risk 5th grade student that is a product of his “unhealthy” family’s lack of stability. Jayden struggles in school with completing academic’s and often times makes up a story to cover for his inadequacies.

Extension Responses  

In February of 2016, the 3rd annual Love Our Family Pasta Bash (Family Night Outing) was held at the Salmon River Central School Cafeteria. Building on previous events, the 4-H Mentors and Mentee’s youth worked together to prepare for this event with Mentee’s setting their “family” table in anticipation of each of their families to arrive for the evening event. In an effort to console Jayden, whose family did not attend, site coordinator(s) welcomed Jayden to sit at the “4-H Family Site Coordinators” table.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Saddened as he was, Jayden was at first reluctant to sit with the 4-H Family Site Coordinators. By creating a welcoming and loving connection, Jayden did sit at the 4-H Family Site Coordinators table. Unlike other Family Night outing participants, Jayden assisted with cleaning up. Perhaps for the first time in his young life, Jayden felt that he was a part of a family. As a result of this evening, Jayden’s attendance to the 4-H Mentoring Afterschool program was steady. Although he continues to have an “unhealthy” family life, Jayden has first-hand experience with 4-H Mentors and Site Coordinators that cannot be taken away. The 4-H Mentoring program has instilled in this young man that there are people in life who do care and are willing to go out of their way to help others like himself to believe in self-worth.

Collaborators  

Salmon River Central School, Office of Justice Juvenile and Delinquency Program (OJJDP); Franklin County Cornell Cooperative Extension 4-H Program.

Special funding sources (if any)  

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, National 4-H


Story Title   Program Makes Accommodations for Special Needs Youth
Program   Franklin - 4-H Youth Development
Educators   Steve M. McDonald
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

4-H Youth Development department of Cornell Cooperative Extension Franklin County works with host district and parents to makes accommodations for a program participant with Asperser Syndrome.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Asperger Syndrome (AS) has been identified with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) according to estimates from CDC’s Autism and Development Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network. Asperger Syndrome is one of a distinct group of complex neurodevelopment disorders characterized by social impairment, communication difficulties, and restrictive, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior.
Special needs youth, especially those diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome, can find the after school setting difficult at times of chaos. Such was the case of one nine-year-old program participant of the Bulldog Hour (Chateaugay Central). Staff noticed that this young lady would physically and emotionally fall apart when over stimulated such as check-in, snack time, and times of mass dismissal. Her disruptive behavior during the busiest times of programming was difficult on staff and peers alike.

Extension Responses  

A meeting was set up with all stakeholders including; CCE Franklin, District Administration, Classroom Teacher, School Phycologist, Special Education Teacher, and parents. Early in the meeting, parents were visibly relieved to see that parties were there for the betterment of their child’s needs. Collaboratively we set a policy in place to ensure this young lady was safe during after school hours, yet able to retreat to a “quiet zone” during those times proven to be difficult to cope. Essentially, upon school dismissal, she would “check-in” and then immediately go to the computer lab where the school Librarian would watch her until Bulldog Hour participants disseminated to their small group locations/activities. From here, she would be given options with regards to participation. Staff would encourage her, but not force her to participate. Special independent, projects, tailored for her interests (Geckos, Cats) would be given to her. Staff would periodically introduce her into whole group activities in an effort to further develop her coping strategies learned by School Phycologist and Special Education Teachers.
Chateaugay Central School District Special Education Teacher, Jessica Johnston provided professional development to Bulldog Hour staff on “Understanding Youth with Special Needs”.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Following the implementation of the afore mentioned practices the student blossomed. She appeared to enjoy the extra independence she was granted and there were no more disruptions (from her) during programming. Periodically staff would schedule time for her to give a presentation on her “special topics/projects” in front of the entire group further developing both her communication skills and social inhibitions.
Staff were able to use the “special accommodations” to educate other program participants on Asperger Syndrome and special needs in generals.
Parents of this program’s participants truly appreciated our efforts to accommodate their daughter and emailed a heartfelt “thank-you”.
District/Association ties strengthened as we collaboratively worked together in the best interest of this family. Additionally, CCE Special Education Teacher, Jessica Johnston has offered assistance with techniques, best practice with regards to other special needs youth attending programming

Collaborators  

Chateaugay Central School District, Office of Children and Family Services, Jessica Johnston (CCS Special Education), Sheila Simenson (parent), Heidi Sample (CCS Elementary Principal), Loretta Fowler (CCS Superintendent), Suzie Jones-King (CCS School Counselor)

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   Renovating Old Apple Trees; Restoring Old Neglected Orchards - Backyard Fruit Growers Apple Tree Pruning Class and Demonstration
Program   Franklin - Ag & Natural Resources - Horticulture
Educators   Richard L. Gast
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

In order to assist a growing number of homeowners and landowners interested in backyard and small orchard apple production, an apple tree pruning class and workshop, designed to help would-be tree pruners learn how to do it right, was offered, in April, by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Franklin County.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

If there is one thing this North Country has plenty of, it's apple trees that haven't been pruned, sprayed, or maintained in any way, shape or form, for years. And while the trees may bear fruit, the apples are often small, misshapen and scabby. People often contact Extension to ask about what they can do to better the quality of the fruit from, and improve the vigor of, older apple trees in their yards, landscape, or old neglected orchards on their property. Many do not even have a basic understanding of pruning techniques (what kinds of cuts to make) or why we prune; nor are they familiar with the tools used for pruning.

Extension Responses  

Employing proper pruning practices will increase the yield and improve the quality of the fruit of trees in all stages of growth. In order to assist homeowners interested in backyard apple production and home orchard restoration, an apple tree pruning class, demonstration, and hands-on workshop, designed to help would-be tree pruners learn how to do it right, was offered, in April, by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Franklin County. The workshop was co-hosted by the Almanzo and Laura Ingalls Wilder Association at the Wilder Farm and Museum, in Burke.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Feedback on the workshop was extremely positive. Many attendees immediately employed what they’d learned; pruning and shaping their unkempt fruit trees to make them more productive, as well as more attractive. Several were very excited about the work they were doing or had done; happily letting me know about their accomplishments. One attendee has applied what he learned to an old stand of trees and is planting a new orchard, as well. We’ve been in touch during the summer about his progress and have addressed issues including concerns that some of his trees were exhibiting leaves that appeared to him as though they may be showing symptoms of fire blight infection. Upon further inspection, it was determined that the blackening of leaves associated with fireblight was not present in the veins and vascular tissue. The marginal leaf burn and slight browning he was seeing was attributed to delayed drought stress combined with late-season changes in physiology; something that has since been reported in several locations across the state.

Collaborators  

Almazo and Laura Ingalls Wilder Association ALIWA), Local Volunteers

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   Review of Container, Square Foot, Raised Bed, and Companion Gardening for Migrant Families
Program   Franklin - Ag & Natural Resources - Horticulture
Educators   Richard L. Gast
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   Yes
Executive Summary  

Empowering displaced individuals and families with limited resources to produce high-quality food for their families can be a key component of self-sufficiency.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Migrants are individuals who are disconnected from home communities; absent from a permanent place of residence for the purpose of seeking or retaining temporary, often seasonal employment. Theirs is a somewhat nomadic lifestyle that follows the availability of work from location to location and that is often associated with poverty and ongoing economic insecurity. They tend to be individuals with limited skills and opportunities, who fill the needs of industries seeking temporary, low-cost labor. Seasonal employment of farm laborers by migrant workers is often an integral part of farming success in the North Country.

In 2014, a group of migrant workers and their families expressed an interest in obtaining and / or brushing up on their gardening skills for a variety of reasons, including higher quality, fresher vegetables to eat, saving money, and purposeful exercise. Their appeal was presented to Franklin County Extension by case worker representatives of the North Country Migrant Education Program, who came to Extension last year, and again this year, to ask if we could provide a review of the practices learned at past programs, along with ongoing support; i.e. providing follow-up assistance with pests and problems experienced during the growing season.

Extension Responses  

A productive beginner vegetable garden can be a key component of individual self-esteem and improved family self-sufficiency. By once again providing an afternoon of research-based knowledge and hands-on skill-learning about using intensive gardening techniques (i.e. containers, raised beds, companion and succession planting) and by being available to provide follow-up assistance when problems occurred, Franklin County Extension was able to further the small-scale home vegetable gardening success of this group of migrant workers and their families.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

At the workshop, some of the participants raised the issue of ‘organic’ gardening and the fact that they were able to produce their own food ‘organically’; essentially thanking me for providing an ongoing program that fosters and supports efforts by these newer growers to provide fresh, healthy, ‘naturally grown’ foods for their families with remarkably low cost. This is a huge benefit for these consumers, who recognize the benefits of naturally grown foods, but are unable to afford the added cost of buying ‘organic’ produce at the markets. Some participants said that they were able to increase their production last year over 2014, with anticipation that they would be able to maintain or improve production this year. Several used the tomatoes and peppers that they’d grown to make homemade salsa and other dishes. Most of the participants reported to their case worker that they’d had modestly to tremendously successful small garden produce production again, this year.

Collaborators  

Bonesteel’s Gardening Center in North Bangor

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   Silviculture Workshop - An Introduction to Timber Harvesting Techniques and Practices and Forest Regeneration
Program   Franklin - Ag & Natural Resources - Horticulture
Educators   Richard L. Gast
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

Woodlands require management, if they are to achieve their full potential; and how landowners manage their piece of the forest ecosystem today can impact that forest for generations.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

Forest products industries represent more than 7 percent of the State's total manufacturing output, contributing nearly $4 billion to our gross economic output and employing over 61,000 people. And of the more than 18.5 million acres of forest in New York State, more than 80% is privately owned.

 

Silviculture is, in essence, the growing and cultivation of trees. It focuses on practices within forest stands, which are used to preserve and to better the stand’s productivity, thereby helping land managers achieve their objectives. Silviculture may be compared to gardening in that it often involves practices such as weeding, thinning, and pruning, and utilizes measures which protect trees and plants from insects, disease, and other natural elements.

 

Just as there are many reasons for harvesting trees, there are many different harvesting methods. Each method has its benefits, drawbacks, and conditions under which it is the most suitable way to harvest trees.

 

Most forest and woodlot owners are aware of the potential for income from the sale of timber harvested from their property. Unfortunately, many are completely unaware of the harmful, long term environmental and financial impacts that can come from poorly planned timber harvesting.

Extension Responses  

In order to provide an opportunity for forest and woodlot landowners and managers (and those looking to purchase forestland) to learn more about harvesting practices and their impacts on forest regeneration and long range conservation planning, and how those practices may be useful in managing a forest timber stand for  sustainable harvest management and improvement, Cornell Cooperative Extension, using a site at the Paul Smiths College Visitors Interpretive Center (VIC), provided a class on forest harvesting and regeneration methodologies on sites where

-        for two summers (1998 and 1999), the US Forest Service worked with Paul Smith’s College on extensive vegetative surveys to gather baseline ecological data on five-acre plots of northern hardwood forests and,

-        in the winter of 1999 / 2000, treatments were carried out on seven of the plots to implement a representative sample of silvicultural systems, including clearcutting, shelterwood, two-aged group selection, single tree selection and no-cutting (on 2 control plots).

-        Second entry treatments were initiated, as prescribed, in 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015.

With the assistance of Peter Smallidge, State Extension Forester with the Cornell University Department of Natural Resources, who lead the program, attendees were able to experience an onsite, in-the-forest training on harvesting. They looked at several plots where silviculture treatments including:

-        selection cutting to produce a  two-aged forest, where all of the largest and a few medium sized trees are cut, leaving a 30 to 50 year old stand and openings that promote vigorous understory growth

-        clearcutting to release the buried seeds of trees that thrive in full sun, such as black cherry, along with brambles and stump sprouts that provide an abundance of food for wildlife and insects

-        select cutting of individual trees, favoring shade tolerant species, in which most of the largest trees are removed

-        select cutting of groups of trees, favoring species that need more sun than the original forest and creating small, temporary areas abundant in wildlife food plants

-        ‘shelterwood’ or regeneration cutting, in which a large percentage of the canopy trees are removed and trees desired in the future forest are favored

Accomplishments and Impacts  

All of the sustainable management strategies observed and discussed at the workshop are timber harvesting practices commonly used in New York State. By being able to observe firsthand how the forest responded over time to these various silviculture practices and what the plots, which are being harvested sustainably, look like years after a harvest, those in attendance were able to leave with:

-        an enhanced comprehension of what their sites will look like soon after and more than a decade after certain timber harvesting practices are initiated

-        an appreciation for the principals of land use and stewardship

-        a much clearer picture of what their options are and what the likely outcomes will be

-        a greatly-increased understanding what it means to apply a forest management plan that employs well-planned timber harvesting to create a sustainable flow of forest timber and greater overall sustainable profitability, producing revenue at regular intervals, (every ten or fifteen years) forever, from a woodlot or forest stand  (vs. a harvest that is based upon short term economic considerations that, all too often, gives rise to timber harvests that result in long term negative environmental impacts and that degrade the future timber value of forest lands) and

-        a realization of just what the impacts of applying sustainable approaches to timber harvesting will have on their timber stands, wildlife habitat, the watershed, the aesthetic beauty, the recreational opportunities, and the spiritual renewal that their forest property offers.

Collaborators  

Paul Smiths College (PSC), the PSC Visitor's Interpretive Center (VIC), State Extension Forester

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   Successful Rural Skills & Homesteading Conference
Program   Franklin - Ag & Natural Resources - Horticulture
Educators   Rick LeVitre
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

The Adirondack Center for Working Landscapes (ACWL), held an extremely successful Homesteading and Rural Skills Conference with over 1,000 people attending. Spectators came to the Paul Smith's College VIC to observe and participate in a multitude of activities from cider pressing to logging demos to preserving foods. From wild edible walks to considering alternative energy for the home to growing hops, hundreds of people enjoyed the sunshine, the fall colors and took in the multitude of presenters and vendor offerings.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

The Adirondack-North Country is uniquely positioned to serve as a model for diverse and vibrant working landscapes. Rooted in a culture of stewardship and entrepreneurial spirit, Paul Smith's College, the VIC and Cornell Cooperative Extension advance a multi-sector vision that connects the region's "foodsheds" and "woodsheds" as integrated components of the working landscape. Beyond sustainable agriculture and forestry, the Adirondack Center for Working Landscapes (ACWL) highlights additional related sectors such as education, agri-tourism, biomass development, education, and sustainable food system development.

 

 

Extension Responses  

Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) Franklin County brought to the partnership its long history of research based education in agriculture, food systems, food nutrition and safety and youth development education through outdoor skills.

 

Accomplishments and Impacts  

Educational displays, action exhibits, agricultural demonstrations and classes, conducted by CCE staff and volunteers, appealed to a wide range of interests and included topics such as: canning, dehydrating jerky, cider making, bow building, renewable energy, raising livestock, poultry processing, foraging for wild edibles, small-scale farming, heating with firewood and primitive skills, cow milking, sheep shearing, beekeeping, soil science, starting a small farm, spinning wool, mushroom identification and growing, growing hops and beer making, tree pruning, exercise and fitness, draft horses, soap making, and blacksmithing and more. Over 1,000 people form over the North Country and beyond attended the day's event.

Collaborators  

Paul Smith's College, The VIC, PSC Clubs, Adirondack Harvest Volunteers, Local farmers, Sodexo, Friends of the VIC, Local businesses, Local media

 

Special funding sources (if any)  

Story Title   Summer Day Camp: The root to success for parents and youth alike!
Program   Franklin - 4-H Youth Development
Educators   Abby Langdon
Steve M. McDonald
Is this related to an Equal Program/Employment Opportunity?   No
Executive Summary  

4-H Youth Development department of Cornell Cooperative Extension Franklin County provides a local summer day camp packed with STEM projects, critical thinking and team building activities, and physical activity. The camp is affordable and attainable for families of all incomes with the help of other local community action agencies and scholarships.

Issues/Needs and Audiences  

“When school's out, kids are actually more likely to engage in obesity-related behaviors such as watching more television, consuming more sugar and eating fewer vegetables, and their exercise levels barely budge, according to a study from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.” (www.mailman.columbia.edu)
“Researchers concluded that the school environment plays an important role in helping kids maintain healthy behaviors and suggested school-based obesity prevention efforts go beyond the school year, in the form of summer meal and activity programs.” (www.mailman.columbia.edu)
“Research shows that children who participate in quality afterschool programs have higher school attendance, academic achievement, and are less likely to be involved in risky behaviors during the afterschool hours” (ocfs.ny.gov, 2015).
There are 2,125 single parent households with children under 18 years of age in Franklin County (Census.gov, 2010). Single parent households have more trouble obtaining quality childcare (ocfs.ny.gov, 2015).

Extension Responses  

Partnering with NYS DOH (Departments of Health) CCE obtained certification to provide a comprehensive and affordable summer day camp for the county community. The day camp included 10 different weekly choices of curricula, including Archery, GIS/Geocaching, Wilderness Education, Jr. and Sr. RASP (Recreation and Sports Play), Arts & Crafts, DDY (Dance Drama & Yoga), and many more. The camp operated from 7:30a-4:30 pm Monday- Friday providing a safe and fun environment for youth 5-12 to learn and grow socially and emotionally during the summer months. Camp counselors of all ages and backgrounds were hired to fully meet the needs of the diverse interests of youth involved. Partnering with the local YMCA and JCEO of Franklin and Clinton counties helped make it possible for this camp to succeed. JCEO provided breakfast and lunch for youth everyday as well as scholarships for families in need. The Greater Malone YMCA provided curriculum for classes and activities associated with physical activity along with assisting in pre-program development and certifications.

Accomplishments and Impacts  

The directors of Camp Akalaka for the 2016 summer were delighted to be informed of one specific youth’s success during camp. The parent of a 10-year-old male, who attended the camp for the entire 10 weeks it was in session, told directors how thankful she was for the program. The parent has another son who is older and who was released from a juvenile detention facility around week 3 of the camp season. She was afraid her younger son, who had been attending camp, may also be tempted to engage in risky behaviors. His being able to attend Camp Akalaka did away with her fears. The parent shared with directors that she believed if her older son had had the opportunity to attend a camp like Camp Akalaka he would not have been tempted to engage in the behaviors and crime he had. Directors were told that, due to the parent’s income, it was difficult for her to work full time and find a safe, affordable and educational place for her older son to attend during the summer months. Camp Akalaka was the perfect solution for this family. The directors even noticed a positive behavior change of the young camper throughout the summer.

Collaborators  

The NYS Department of Health, The Greater Malone YMCA, Joint Council for Economic Opportunity of Clinton and Franklin Counties (JCEO), Village of Malone

Special funding sources (if any)